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I finally went farther than 3 feet.

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  • I finally went farther than 3 feet.

    It finally happened. On Wednesday Sept. 9th I unloaded my hydro into the water and made a good 4-5 laps. It was an unreal feeling after so many hours and mishaps. I even for a time had the whole rig for sale.....and in fact sold it but Covid got in the way of the sale and I decided to just keep trying. I was really surprised at how fast it hooked up and started to fly. My brother took a few laps in it and now he wants one. I still have a ton to learn. I'm having issues with the choke return and it didn't want to start once in the water but I will lean on the experts to help me get the tune right. Really looking forward to a more successful outing for my new rookie first season at Millville in the Spring. Thanks to everyone who unselfishly gave their time and money to help me. I can't thank you all enough.




  • #2
    Had the same experience this Summer when getting out in a boat for the first time. It’s quite a unique adrenaline rush.
    Congrats on getting your boat together and getting in the water.
    Hard starting in the water is a common problem it seems. I think the best solution is to warm the motor up out of the water for 15-20 seconds. Then get ready to go and have one person on each side of the boat. With both people lifting the boat up so the prop is slightly out of the water then the cord can be pulled.

    Comment


    • Dave Cofone
      Dave Cofone commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks, Albert. Unfortunately I don't have a team. I am pretty much solo and rely on the other racers for help on race day. Congratulations on your outing, this is the coolest sport ever.

  • #3
    Lean forward when starting because the pipe opening will be blocked by water if the engine sits low in the water, creates back pressure, same as putting a potato in your car exhaust. Also when you are done for the day, you should dry fire your engine on land to dry it out. Moisture in the exhaust will wick up into the crankcase and screw up your crank and bearings over time. You should also use a test wheel when dry firing, it is hard on rod bearings if you don’t and I know everyone does it without one but it doesn’t mean that it is good for the engine. Baby steps, you’ll get to where you want to be.

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    • #4
      Thanks for the tips. There are some parts and pieces I should have. A test wheel is one of them. I plan to be a good student. There are so many awesome experienced folks available to me, I am very lucky to be involved in a sport where people freely share their extensive knowledge. I don't know squat about outboards so I look forward to learning everything I can.



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      • #5
        Dave,
        Any pictures from the momentous occasion?

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        • Dave Cofone
          Dave Cofone commented
          Editing a comment
          Yes. They are on my friends cell phone. When she sends them to me I will post a couple up.

      • #6
        Originally posted by Albert View Post
        Had the same experience this Summer when getting out in a boat for the first time. It’s quite a unique adrenaline rush.
        Congrats on getting your boat together and getting in the water.
        Hard starting in the water is a common problem it seems. I think the best solution is to warm the motor up out of the water for 15-20 seconds. Then get ready to go and have one person on each side of the boat. With both people lifting the boat up so the prop is slightly out of the water then the cord can be pulled.
        Make it only 5 to 10 seconds at most..... closer to only 5 seconds.... and just blip the throttle... no full throttle.
        sigpic

        Dean F. Hobart

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        • Albert
          Albert commented
          Editing a comment
          So basically start it, shut it down and put it in the water and go?
          Last edited by Albert; 09-10-2020, 02:37 PM.

      • #7
        Well I tried to upload a photo but when I try I get an error message,'failed due to not supporting image type'......Errrrrr frustration.



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        • Albert
          Albert commented
          Editing a comment
          I have had 0 percent success with uploading to the site since the last update. I've been hotlinking to a social media account.

      • #8
        I believe there was some mention of photographic evidence.

        Comment


        • Dave Cofone
          Dave Cofone commented
          Editing a comment
          Indeed there was. Read post number 7 and you'll see why there isn't.

      • #9
        Hmmm, The site had been sorted and was allowing uploads of photos. But I just tried 3 times on two separate devises and it seems to be bugging up again.
        Last edited by Albert; 12-06-2020, 12:42 PM.

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        • Dave Cofone
          Dave Cofone commented
          Editing a comment
          Even if I could upload a couple of photo's they just look like somebody far away running a tiny boat through a bunch of moored sailboats and one of me in my safety gear and helmet standing next to the boat. Crappy cell phone photo's. To this day I don't have one really good picture of any of my motorcycle racing or old inboard 145. I only have on good shot of me when I was 20 years old sitting on my Hobie 16. Youth is truly wasted on the young.

      • #10
        Originally posted by deeougee View Post
        Lean forward when starting because the pipe opening will be blocked by water if the engine sits low in the water, creates back pressure, same as putting a potato in your car exhaust. Also when you are done for the day, you should dry fire your engine on land to dry it out. Moisture in the exhaust will wick up into the crankcase and screw up your crank and bearings over time. You should also use a test wheel when dry firing, it is hard on rod bearings if you don’t and I know everyone does it without one but it doesn’t mean that it is good for the engine. Baby steps, you’ll get to where you want to be.
        Deeougee

        How does a test wheel help with a dry fire on land, not much air resistance but there is rotational inertia, is that it for safe on rod bearings?

        When I get ready for a run with the Y80 I cart the boat to the lake shore and get the prop about 1/2 in the water with boat on the cart. Then start it and keep the revs low and no blips, for about 20 sec, prop has lots of resistance so rod bearings loaded. It does not move forward on the cart with low revs. Then shut down and shove in the water, get in and rope over. My 80 with locked mad starts easy in the water with no lift up, always been that way, maybe carb low setting at 1-1/4 open? Always have other boats there for rescue if needed. At end of running I load on cart and dry fire at lake edge for about 5 sec prop not in water. Probably can't do this at a sanctioned boat race, I do it at AOMCI meets no issues there.
        Pete
        "Keep Move'n" life is catching up!
        No man's life, liberty or property are safe while the legislature is in session.

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        • #11



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            • #13
              Hey it worked..... The second photo is me running on the outside of the sailboat moorings and thats my son in in the kayak rescue boat to the left.



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              • #14
                Hazzah!
                Boat looks good and you look geared up.

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