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Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

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  • #16

    Re: Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

    WOW! Thanks for all the responses, REALLY helpful. Here are my conclusions:
    1. I need a truck. So, I'll sell the minivan (it is a 2008 with 250K on it and was thinking about new car anyway). If I can figure out how to get my bike in the ridgeline I'll get one of those. It drives great and rated to 5000 lb towing.
    2. I need an enclosed trailer. I don't have inside storage, would like to protect the boats from sun, rain, damage, theft.
    3. Should go with the 7' wide trailer.
    Whew! A few follow up questions.
    1. Seems like I can get a 12' 6" marathon boat in the 7x12, if the V adds 2 feet.
      1. Do you agree?
      2. How tall does the interior dimension need to be if I want to get a CSH/300SSH in also without tilting on the side, or removing the windshield?
    2. Most of the single axle 7x12s are around 1300-1400 lbs empty. GVWR is generally 2990. This leaves about 1400-1500 in cargo. 2x Boats at 150 = 300. Three motors = 300. Carts, tools, canopy, chairs, misc.=300. Mounting racks = 100. Seems like I'd have about 1000 in equipment. Does this assumption (that a single axle would be sufficient) make sense?
    Thanks again for all the great feedback!
    Last edited by ScatCat; 10-22-2018, 09:33 PM.

    Comment


    • Harold8
      Harold8 commented
      Editing a comment
      I have a single axel 7x12 and carry 2 CSH and 2 302s, installed on floor in v nose is a 4 drawer tool chest and a cabinate on one wall of the v. Plus sundry chairs , spare tire etc./No problem towing with a Honda Pilot, gas mileage is not great tho!
      Last edited by Harold8; 10-23-2018, 08:12 PM.

  • #17

    Re: Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

    I have looked Trailers over very closely and have been pulling them for about 30 years all shapes and sizes. We are running the same classes. I already have mine picked out just waiting to get rid of my open. I don't like stuff laying around. Your making a mistake that most first time enclosed trailer buyers make.
    Your buying just big enough to get by....Barely your going to become very frustrated.
    I wouldn't get anything smaller than a 7◊14 V-nose with Dual axles and Brakes the actual weight is not much more towing capacity is better and getting STOPPED easier is a big plus. IMHO
    Ram4x4, 61-W and 2 others like this.

    Comment


    • #18

      Re: Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

      Yes for sure.... Duel Axles and Brakes. The RNR Trailer Company in Constantine, Michigan makes all aluminum trailers which would be lighter in weight. You might want to check them out.... Iím sure they could answer your questions.
      sigpic

      Dean F. Hobart

      Comment


      • Flatiron
        Flatiron commented
        Editing a comment
        Actually the Aluminum are not much lighter. They have to use more material to achieve the structural integrity they need when building out of Aluminum. The Pro about aluminum is they don't rust. If you live up here in the North

      • Ram4x4
        Ram4x4 commented
        Editing a comment
        And the aluminum trailers are way more expensive too.

    • #19

      Re: Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

      Flatiron.... Thank you for the input, that does make sense.
      sigpic

      Dean F. Hobart

      Comment


      • #20

        Re: Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

        Scat Cat,, when you have time,, please send me a private message with your email address and I will send you a photo of a perfect open trailer .
        I will also send you some of the specs for duplicating it. I am assuming you have welding capabilities or a good friend that can weld.



        Comment


        • #21

          Re: Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

          Whoa, if your marathon is 12' 6", even a 14 footer is going to be tight and that 12 footer with V would require you to put the boat dead center in the trailer. That leaves you 9" of space on each end and very little room on each side of the boat to move around in the trailer. Don't forget, you're probably going to build in some kind of rack too and you'll need room for engines, tools, extra stuff.

          ​I know you gotta get what you can get, but I'd go absolute minimum of 14ft, preferably 16ft and make sure it's tall enough for you to stand up inside. Trying to get engines in and out while having to move around humped over won't be fun, or good for your back.

          ​As for the tow vehicle, my personal opinion is that a Honda Ridgeline is going to work hard to tow a 14 or larger trailer. The size of the vehicle isn't an issue, but a v-6 rated at 280HP is going to struggle. Will it do it? Sure, but you're going to kill that engine (and probably hate every minute of the drive with that trailer). If it was only a very occasional affair and local pulling, no problem, but if you're hitting the road for 4,5, 6 or more hours to hit races semi-constantly, I'd consider a full size pickup and a v-8. You'll get just as good, if not better mileage because the 8 will have more lower RPM torque (less high revving) and it won't have to work as hard. New v-8 trucks will impress you with the gas mileage.

          The Ridgeline is EPA rated 18 city and 25 highway in AWD config. My 2018 Silverado with the bigger 6.2L v-8 (420HP) is running 20-21 MPG back and forth to work (19 miles each way of combined city and 55 MPH driving) and my last trip to Ohio (2.5 hours) on the highway netted me almost 29MPG. Even towing my boat (open trailer) I got 20MPG in a 2.5 hour drive to Lock Haven.

          Anyway, that's my 2 cents worth.
          Last edited by Ram4x4; 10-23-2018, 05:33 PM.
          Dane Lance
          700-P
          CSH/500Mod

          Comment


          • #22

            Re: Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

            As far as building your own from the ground up. Know your state laws and titling requirements. Here in Pennsylvania if you build one from scratch you are going to have about $400.00 just in Titling fees. That's the reason I bought a 1985 Hustler Bass boat trailer with title in hand and built off of that platform.
            Another bit of advice on a enclosed is color. Like I said previously I all ready have one picked out. But when I was shopping I went to to the lot to look and 2 exactly the same trailers was sitting next to each other one black 1 white. It was hard to belive the temperature difference inside. The Black one was like a oven it was unreal

            Comment


            • Dave Cofone
              Dave Cofone commented
              Editing a comment
              If I could add one more thing. I have had two enclosed trailers for motorcycle racing. It took one year to move up from a small single axle to a 7x14 with dual axles and slim side fenders, (tires were moved inboard so there were just about three inches of fender on the exterior. The extra space was awesome however moving it around on the dolly was sometimes a two man job on the slightest incline. Electric brakes on a trailer this size is mandatory.....but the single biggest favor you can do for yourself is spend the extra buck and get torsion bar suspension. The difference is night and day. Standard spring suspension will get the job done but will also bounce everything in the trailer like it was on a trampoline. The torsion bars allow each wheel to indepentently and smoothly traverse any obstacle. The contents will hardly know you just went over railroad tracks. Resale with torsion bars is also higher. Just my 2 cents.

          • #23

            Re: Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

            Whoa, if your marathon is 12' 6", even a 14 footer is going to be tight and that 12 footer with V would require you to put the boat dead center in the trailer. That leaves you 9" of space on each end and very little room on each side of the boat to move around in the trailer. Don't forget, you're probably going to build in some kind of rack too and you'll need room for engines, tools, extra stuff.
            I guess I'm confused. A 14' v-nose is a 14 foot box, with 2.75' in the V for a total of 201" (per specs). Seems like a 14' would work and give me 4'3" of space to work with front to back.

            Thanks for the recommendation on the R&R in Constantine. Reached out to them and given the specs, they seem to have a good trailer. Bonus: They come with the torsion axles on the 7x14. Will get white to keep the heat down.

            On the truck front, I think I'm stuck with the Ridgeline. Will cause issues with the SO if I go with a Ford/Ram/Chevy V8. I may end up not liking it, but I don't think I will race more than 6x/year.

            Comment


            • Dave Cofone
              Dave Cofone commented
              Editing a comment
              This has been another great thread, I learned some good info and thought about what I will be doing. I came to the conclusion, we don't have enclosed trailers in inboard so what would I need one for in outboard. I have had enclosed trailers for my race bikes and they weigh a ton, very difficult to maneuver with a trailer dolly and they cost a good bit of money. So if I am fortunate enough to acquire a hydro and motor I will be using an open trailer.....probably built up from a standard flat bed trailer......

          • #24

            Re: Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

            I put my boat on the roof of the van now. No more trailer misery. I am in HEAVEN.
            522-P



            Comment


            • #25

              Re: Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

              I put my boat on the roof of the van now. No more trailer misery. I am in HEAVEN.
              522-P
              How is a trailer equaling misery?
              The idea is to transport your boat in a manner that protects it and allows you to have everything stored away and self contained. Everything goes in the trailer and you don't end up forgetting things like ..... boat carts.

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