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Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

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  • ScatCat
    started a topic Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

    Trailer: Enclosed vs. Open experience and advice

    Looking into trailers. Drive a V6 Honda Odyssey. Want to purchase a trailer to hold 2 boats, 1 CSH/300SSH and 1 CSR Marathon (12'6" to 13'). A few questions:
    1. Would you put a new boat on an open trailer? Do you get lots of road rash (stones etc.) that damage boats on an open trailer?
    2. If you were to get an enclosed cargo trailer...
      1. What is the minimum size 6x14? 7x14?
      2. Would you get a vnose or square?
      3. Would you get a single or dual axle? Remember, being pulled by minivan?
    3. What other questions should I be asking that I'm not asking?
    Thanks!

  • HRTV
    replied
    Regarding open or closed trailers, in 2017 IOGP drivers traveled all the way to Mexico in the dead of winter with open trailers. They even ran into winter storms. This is about as hardcore as it gets with an open trailer

    IOGP Teams trek through winter storms to reach season finale venue in Manzanillo Mexico http://bit.ly/2BDjnc6

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  • mercguy
    replied
    I have rigged many trailers, purchased new and used, and have found that the price difference in cost for both width and height is minimal, so for a little more, it is generally worth it .You could get both in a 6 ft height trailer, width may be more important, depending on how you attach the bunks. I combined both the safety of enclosed, with the ability to view the race boats and motors like an open trailer.Hopefully educating the public to the existence of stock outboard boat racing.
    Show off!! 😁

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  • Dave Cofone
    commented on 's reply
    That is cool. Reminds me of the trailers and truck rigs, Drag Racer Tommy Ivo used for his dragsters and funny cars.....

  • Herb Lanphear
    replied
    I have rigged many trailers, purchased new and used, and have found that the price difference in cost for both width and height is minimal, so for a little more, it is generally worth it .You could get both in a 6 ft height trailer, width may be more important, depending on how you attach the bunks. I combined both the safety of enclosed, with the ability to view the race boats and motors like an open trailer.Hopefully educating the public to the existence of stock outboard boat racing.

    Leave a comment:


  • jsilvestri
    replied
    No problem with the height if you are only going to carry two boats. My trailer is that height and I've carried a CSH and CSR in it for years. Now, if you ever think you'll get a third boat you'll need more height. I wish mine was 6'6" or even 7' tall but to late for me.

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  • ScatCat
    replied
    All the input has been extremely valuable. I think, after looking for a couple weeks, I'm going to go with an R&R trailer with torsion axles. My last (?) question: I have a CSR marathon (13'5") and a CSH/300H. If I get a 6' standard height trailer, will I get the boats in, or will I have to remove cowlings? If I need extra height, is 6" enough? Thanks!

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  • Dave Cofone
    commented on 's reply
    This has been another great thread, I learned some good info and thought about what I will be doing. I came to the conclusion, we don't have enclosed trailers in inboard so what would I need one for in outboard. I have had enclosed trailers for my race bikes and they weigh a ton, very difficult to maneuver with a trailer dolly and they cost a good bit of money. So if I am fortunate enough to acquire a hydro and motor I will be using an open trailer.....probably built up from a standard flat bed trailer......

  • susqueduck
    replied
    I put my boat on the roof of the van now. No more trailer misery. I am in HEAVEN.
    522-P
    How is a trailer equaling misery?
    The idea is to transport your boat in a manner that protects it and allows you to have everything stored away and self contained. Everything goes in the trailer and you don't end up forgetting things like ..... boat carts.

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  • squirrelboydeluxe
    replied
    I put my boat on the roof of the van now. No more trailer misery. I am in HEAVEN.
    522-P

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  • ScatCat
    replied
    Whoa, if your marathon is 12' 6", even a 14 footer is going to be tight and that 12 footer with V would require you to put the boat dead center in the trailer. That leaves you 9" of space on each end and very little room on each side of the boat to move around in the trailer. Don't forget, you're probably going to build in some kind of rack too and you'll need room for engines, tools, extra stuff.
    I guess I'm confused. A 14' v-nose is a 14 foot box, with 2.75' in the V for a total of 201" (per specs). Seems like a 14' would work and give me 4'3" of space to work with front to back.

    Thanks for the recommendation on the R&R in Constantine. Reached out to them and given the specs, they seem to have a good trailer. Bonus: They come with the torsion axles on the 7x14. Will get white to keep the heat down.

    On the truck front, I think I'm stuck with the Ridgeline. Will cause issues with the SO if I go with a Ford/Ram/Chevy V8. I may end up not liking it, but I don't think I will race more than 6x/year.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave Cofone
    commented on 's reply
    If I could add one more thing. I have had two enclosed trailers for motorcycle racing. It took one year to move up from a small single axle to a 7x14 with dual axles and slim side fenders, (tires were moved inboard so there were just about three inches of fender on the exterior. The extra space was awesome however moving it around on the dolly was sometimes a two man job on the slightest incline. Electric brakes on a trailer this size is mandatory.....but the single biggest favor you can do for yourself is spend the extra buck and get torsion bar suspension. The difference is night and day. Standard spring suspension will get the job done but will also bounce everything in the trailer like it was on a trampoline. The torsion bars allow each wheel to indepentently and smoothly traverse any obstacle. The contents will hardly know you just went over railroad tracks. Resale with torsion bars is also higher. Just my 2 cents.

  • Flatiron
    replied
    As far as building your own from the ground up. Know your state laws and titling requirements. Here in Pennsylvania if you build one from scratch you are going to have about $400.00 just in Titling fees. That's the reason I bought a 1985 Hustler Bass boat trailer with title in hand and built off of that platform.
    Another bit of advice on a enclosed is color. Like I said previously I all ready have one picked out. But when I was shopping I went to to the lot to look and 2 exactly the same trailers was sitting next to each other one black 1 white. It was hard to belive the temperature difference inside. The Black one was like a oven it was unreal

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  • Harold8
    commented on 's reply
    I have a single axel 7x12 and carry 2 CSH and 2 302s, installed on floor in v nose is a 4 drawer tool chest and a cabinate on one wall of the v. Plus sundry chairs , spare tire etc./No problem towing with a Honda Pilot, gas mileage is not great tho!
    Last edited by Harold8; 10-23-2018, 07:12 PM.

  • Ram4x4
    replied
    Whoa, if your marathon is 12' 6", even a 14 footer is going to be tight and that 12 footer with V would require you to put the boat dead center in the trailer. That leaves you 9" of space on each end and very little room on each side of the boat to move around in the trailer. Don't forget, you're probably going to build in some kind of rack too and you'll need room for engines, tools, extra stuff.

    ​I know you gotta get what you can get, but I'd go absolute minimum of 14ft, preferably 16ft and make sure it's tall enough for you to stand up inside. Trying to get engines in and out while having to move around humped over won't be fun, or good for your back.

    ​As for the tow vehicle, my personal opinion is that a Honda Ridgeline is going to work hard to tow a 14 or larger trailer. The size of the vehicle isn't an issue, but a v-6 rated at 280HP is going to struggle. Will it do it? Sure, but you're going to kill that engine (and probably hate every minute of the drive with that trailer). If it was only a very occasional affair and local pulling, no problem, but if you're hitting the road for 4,5, 6 or more hours to hit races semi-constantly, I'd consider a full size pickup and a v-8. You'll get just as good, if not better mileage because the 8 will have more lower RPM torque (less high revving) and it won't have to work as hard. New v-8 trucks will impress you with the gas mileage.

    The Ridgeline is EPA rated 18 city and 25 highway in AWD config. My 2018 Silverado with the bigger 6.2L v-8 (420HP) is running 20-21 MPG back and forth to work (19 miles each way of combined city and 55 MPH driving) and my last trip to Ohio (2.5 hours) on the highway netted me almost 29MPG. Even towing my boat (open trailer) I got 20MPG in a 2.5 hour drive to Lock Haven.

    Anyway, that's my 2 cents worth.
    Last edited by Ram4x4; 10-23-2018, 04:33 PM.

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