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  • hydro sponson question

    Since hydros have to have rounded sponsons, why can runabout have pointed bows, not rounded in some way? Just curious.




  • #2

    Re: hydro sponson question

    -many were, and some still are . Andy Hanson's 'duck-bills ' were dominant, as were Craig Crafts. Some say it is easier to build a square nose than a pointy one . I would guess there has not been a demonstrated issue with runabouts ?
    bill hoctor likes this.
    Brian Hendrick, #66 F
    "the harder we try, the worser it gets"



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    • #3

      Re: hydro sponson question

      The nose on a runabout rides a little higher???



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      • #4

        Re: hydro sponson question

        Because all the runabouts would be too short and not meet the dimensions, therefore being illegal, if we made them round them?
        bh/ likes this.
        "Ask anyone, I have no friends. I do have some people that put up with me and mostly because they like the rest of my family"

        Don Allen

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        • #5

          Re: hydro sponson question

          Because pre side fin boats, most convention runabouts were able to turn right without dire consequences?
          csh-2z and Racers Edge like this.
          DAVEY 18w

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          • #6

            Re: hydro sponson question

            The one instance of a 90 degree impact causing an injury, happened in a hydro. A hydro, unlike a runabout (in most cases) the only protection a driver has is the coaming. The runabout has a side to deflect the bow of a boat from piercing into the cockpit. I was initially against the rule because there is an extremely rare possibility of a 90 degree impact. If the angle of the impact is less than or greater than 90 degrees, the sponson would mostly deflect or glance off of the coaming reducing the possibility of spearing the cockpit. Unfortunately, even the radiused nose of a sponson could, at a 90 degree impact, still pierce a coaming because we have not, with this rule, reduced the area of impact or the Pounds per square inch (PSI) of force. Now, you just have a bigger hammer.
            bill hoctor likes this.

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            • #7

              Re: hydro sponson question

              Well, technically, the PSI is reduced, the larger the impact face area, the less PSI on the specific area involved for the same force appllied. Still, I'm less concerned with the sponson piercing the coaming than I am of the coaming just simply snapping off on impact. There's a lot of momentum in a 450+lb boat moving at any speed and the side walls of our cockpits are not heavily reinforced. I mean, if a 200ish lb driver can bust through it in a hard hook, a full boat at more than twice the weight is going to snap it right off in a dead on collision.

              I'd say most collisions of that sort are most likely to happen in a turn when a leading boat spins and bares it's side to oncoming boats. Fortunately, the speeds there are less than full on down a straight, but they are still moving pretty decently. To compound the issue, if a boat spins, due to the direction we travel, the side exposed is the same side the driver leans out of, so there is even less coaming wall to protect the driver.

              At best, I see the rounded sponson as a mitigater, but nothing that will prevent a boat from outright crashing through the side of another.

              The question then, is are we looking to completely prevent another boat from passing through another, or to minimize it? A big difference in the two.

              Dane Lance
              700-P
              CSH/500Mod

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              • #8

                Re: hydro sponson question

                I think all we can expect is to minimize the possibility. I still believe also, that the round tip sponson still has a very small impact area. The points on the sponson tips before the rule were not sharp like a blade or spear. Think of a bowling ball, with about a 5" radius still only strikes the target on one tiny point. That's how they roll!

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