Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

All opinions welcomed ...

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • All opinions welcomed ...

    So, if you were to introduce a group of new, young (think J/A) drivers to outboard racing that have no experience or knowledge of the sport which would be easier for them to understand ... hydros or runabouts? Which classification would have the shorter learning curve to learn how to drive? What would they find easier to handle? Which classification would they think would be the "neatest", "coolest"' , "sickest" (pick your generation) to impress your friends?
    Untethered from reality!

  • #2

    Re: All opinions welcomed ...

    I would be particularly interested in hearing from some new, young racers that didn't race a year ago.
    Untethered from reality!

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: All opinions welcomed ...

      I work a lot of trade shows with our club and I've always described it to new people here in these two terms... hydroplanes are like street bikes, you get in and drive it, and for the most part the boat takes you for a ride. A runabout (roll up) is more like a dirt bike, needs more body English and you muscle it and take the boat for a ride. Also here (the great white north), Hydroplanes are like snow skiing... anyone can get in and drive it and learn the basics in a few minutes. Runabouts are like snow boarding, it's learning curve is longer but more fun once you figure it out. Hydroplanes look much cooler and racy though in my opinion.
      Al Lang, jsilvestri and 3 others like this.
      Fralick Racing
      Like our Facebook Team page "Here"

      Comment


      • dwhitford
        dwhitford commented
        Editing a comment
        DITTO! I wholly agree,

    • #4

      Re: All opinions welcomed ...

      Nice thing about runabouts is when you are done racing, you can put the oars back in and go fishing!
      Flatiron likes this.

      Comment


      • #5

        Re: All opinions welcomed ...

        So, if you were to introduce a group of new, young (think J/A) drivers to outboard racing that have no experience or knowledge of the sport which would be easier for them to understand ... hydros or runabouts? Which classification would have the shorter learning curve to learn how to drive? What would they find easier to handle? Which classification would they think would be the "neatest", "coolest"' , "sickest" (pick your generation) to impress your friends?
        Simple.... Do both... They will figure it out as to which they like the most.... Likely that they will like both equally.
        sigpic

        Dean F. Hobart

        Comment


        • #6

          Re: All opinions welcomed ...

          For driver's school,we use hydroplane to get them a ride.Once they are hooked ,then can they can explore the runabouts.Most j drivers end up running both.For anyone taking a ride for the first time,the hydro is the safest way to go.
          Flatiron and Matt Dagostino like this.

          Comment


          • #7

            Re: All opinions welcomed ...

            From my 14 year old daughter who attended 2 ABPBA driver schools in 2013 in j hydro before part-time racing in 2014, and full-time JH/JR racing in 2015...

            "As a "millennial" myself I often find it hard to 'impress' my friends or peers. This being said, when I was nine going into drivers school I learned how to drive a hydroplane first. I believe this is the best way to start young drivers as a j runabout can be rough. I do know that APBA as a whole is trying to grow the sport especially with youngsters. Thus, easing them into the j class is best when you start with hydroplanes. Now for the "sickest" class that is a biased response that varies between drivers. Although, my personal learning curve was quicker with runabouts I have seen several drivers struggle to understand the complexity with runabouts. "

            I will add to her comments, the J runabout can be a little bit fickle to tune the balance for the boat, motor and driver which is why you often see J runabouts porpoising down the straightaway... the J hydro seems to be more stable for new drivers.
            Last edited by bmitch1; 10-25-2017, 08:35 AM.
            dpdeck likes this.

            Comment


            • #8

              Re: All opinions welcomed ...

              I wish I had more time to answer this question...

              1. Runabout vs. Hydro - doesn't matter. A boat is a boat is a boat.
              2. Motors - OMCs are a pain to start, Mercs are a pain and SW are even a bigger pain to start. SW is working on a starter for the new flywheel (which I've ordered and will install on my daughter's rig). Make sure whatever motor is used (preferably the SW) that it has a starter on it along with an impeller.
              3. Boat carts, storage and packing up for the day - everyone agrees: packing up at the end of the day is the worst part. Make sure your cart is balanced so a 10y kid can pull it along and mom and dad doesn't have to. Leave the motor on the boat and built the boat so it can support the motor 100% of the time. Make the boat and cart roll onto the trailer and with 3 straps, you're ready to go.
              4. Cut gear - make it cool. Go to the cycle shop and every dirt bike weekend warrior has their own "look" with their name on the back. Let the kids paint the helmet any color, any pattern to allow them to create their own "look and brand".
              5. Getting wet sucks - have the kids wear water-proof kayak pants for comfort.
              6. Mandatory tech - beginning of each day, have the new kid bring a carb to inspection take it apart and put it together. New part every race weekend.
              pav225, Charlie Pater and 2 others like this.
              http://vitalire.com/

              Comment


              • #9

                Re: All opinions welcomed ...

                One thing APBA should do is send the J props back and have them repiched. It's a crime to see those kids struggle to get their boat on plane.

                Comment


                • GrandpaRacer
                  GrandpaRacer commented
                  Editing a comment
                  That happens in the beginning of the season but by the end it rarely happens as people learn proper set ups and weight distribution (and fix bad engines). I am thinking at the last few races this year all got on a plane. John Adams

              • #10

                Re: All opinions welcomed ...

                The difficulty in the JR class is a multifaceted situation. The problem is partly due to the fact that the class specs require too long a boat. This is a product of the J/A equipment evolution. Before the OMC A motor, there were only J specific boats. The idea of a J/A boat would have been ridiculous with the 60J. This is still ridiculous. While the Js are going faster, it is only like 5-7 mph faster than it was then. Yet, a current J is still 10-12-15 mph slower than an A. This would be like running A on a C runabout. The class weight is another problem. A 65 pound kid with a 75 pound motor plus 20 for gear needs a 130 lb boat to make weight. That is a C runabout. No wonder they all porpoise. The CoG and weight of the motor don't help either. The weight to power ratio of the motor when restricted is a lot to overcome getting on plane. And the CoG hurts in cornering anything but, especially runabouts.

                I think everyone knows how I feel. Runabouts are the Best! There is nothing more rewarding and enjoyable in the world of boat racing than rolling up a small runabout. Its the tits. It is boat racing at its purest. Boat racing at its simplest. Driving a JR should be the easiest thing in the world. If we are going to put a 65 pound kid in a boat the thing should **** near drive itself. The fact that we have issues is a sign that the class has evolved in the wrong direction.

                While it may be true that it is easier to jump in a hydroplane and go drive it around the lake, the comparison is not that simple. The only reason for this, I think, is that you will not get a decent ride out of a runabout without squeezing the throttle and getting in the back of the boat. You can sit and cruise in a hydro. It's that simple. A hydroplane will coddle you while you figure it out. Make you feel better about yourself, stroke your hair, tell you 'it's okay, it happens to everyone.' A runabout wants to be rode hard and put away wet. Still, mastery of either is not easy and takes many, many heats. Hydroplanes are absolutely more dangerous, even if the stability of the ride may make it not seem that way. Runabouts are not only safer, but more forgiving to drive. Hydrobouts perfectly combine the work of driving a runabout down the straightaway and the sketchiness of a hydroplane in the corner. I think the only reason that runabouts have not evolved to become easier to drive (as the hydroplanes have) is because of the use of side fins and the elimination of the deck height dimensions which led to all the non-traditional runabout designs.
                Ryan Runne
                9-H
                Wacusee Speedboats
                ryan.runne.4@gmail.com

                "Imagination is more important than knowledge"--Albert Einstein

                Comment


                • Smitty
                  Smitty commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Uh, WHICH hydro?!! My homebuilt (with great enthusiasm and love) Hal Kelly Jupiter hydro threw me out in each of my first two heats of racing. But the next year I bought a new Karelsen, and it was like you say.
              Working...
              X